Traveller, Photographer, Mountaineer, Human

Posts tagged “Ellidel

Ellidel Underwater

This post has been in my saved drafts for a long time and only now do I get to publish it. It shows Ellidel under the sea in Fortune Island.  This is one of the deeper dives we’ve been to (around 8m) and probably second only to El Nido.  For scuba diving and experienced freedivers, 8m is shallow but for us, it is already lung-busting.freedive fortune island

Advertisements

Giant Clams!

This is my very first time to post a video here!

This was taken last weekend on our trip to Hundred Islands in Alaminos, Pangasinan.  There is a sanctuary for giant clams (known in Tagalog as taklobo) there are probably hundreds of them.

Please forgive the jerky motion and lack of resolution, clarity, etc. of the video.  This was taken using Olympus TG2, with correction in exposure, contrast and vibrance in Lightroom and then spliced together using Windows Movie Maker.


Batanes – Tiñan Viewpoint, Sabtang Island

Tiñan Viewpoint is a hill near the Sabtang Road overlooking the sea.  For me, it is the best viewpoint in the whole of Batanes.  It is located very near the village of Chavayan and is marked by an arch (probably as a boundary between Chavayan and Savidug).

The Arch near Tiñan viewpoint.

Me on a hill overlooking the sea.

Ellidel taking some shot of a cliff face.

Beach below the viewpoint * The hills up to the road (the one with the arch) and towards a rocky outcrop.

A group shot taken by our driver/tour guide (tour guides should really be taught basic composition so not every photo they take has the subject in the middle).

 


Ellidel, Lady of the Yellow Forest

An infrared snapshot of Ellidel in the rocky outcrop on the edge of the beach.


CORON, after Yolanda (Haiyan)

Have not posted in a while.  Last weekend, my friends and I went to Coron for a 4-day trip.

Coron was the last landfall that Yolanda made before exiting the country (the very reason why our scheduled trip there was postponed).  The people of Coron are slowly rising up and moving on with their everyday lives.  The tourists are also starting to come back.  On land, the damage to Coron is visible due to uprooted or de-leafed trees and destroyed houses (mostly the nipa hut houses).

On sea, the damage is much much worse.  Most of the areas we went snorkeling are tear-inducing.  Corals damaged!  If you’ve seen the damage to Tacloban city, you’ll have a good idea of the damage on corals.  Corals, the houses and food source of most fishes, are cracked, uprooted, felled and broken.  To me this is the greater tragedy in Coron (after the loss of some lives).  Trees will grow quickly, houses can be rebuilt with the right assistance but corals will take years to grow back.  Such a tragedy!

Anyway, as a starter, here are my friends doing their best to spell CORON.  More pictures to follow in coming blogposts.


Using a Flash and a Reflector

I bought a wireless flash (Nissin Di 622 II) and it works great with my 7D (which has a flash commander as the popup flash).  I also got the biggest circular reflector I can find.  Last Nov. 3, I tried it out with a few of my friends in Eman and Tiny’s apartment.

Such wonders!  I’ve never used both properly and again I was amazed at how much they make pictures (particularly portraits) so much better (compared to ambient light only or hard flash only).  Both also make my 15-85mm lens appear much sharper.  Here they are:


Ellidel

Elaine

Oyet * Eman


Swimming with Whale Sharks, the Gentle Giants of Oslob, Cebu

September 11, 2013

Our main purpose for our travel to Cebu really is to swim and see the whale sharks, the biggest fish and is locally known as butanding.

The butandings are regularly sighted in Oslob, Cebu, a coastal town 3.5 hours south of Cebu City.  We arrivedat our hotel in Oslob the previous day and had to wake up early to meet the gentle giants.  The butandings regularly go near the shore of Brgy. Tan-awan every morning as the fishermen (who have become boatmen for tourists) feed them small shrimps.  The cost of meeting the butanding is Php500 per person.  Before our boat went to the feeding area to meet the butanding, we were required by local ordinance to attend a very brief orientation conducted by the local government or DENR.  The lady basically said:  no flash photography, do not touch the whale sharks, stay 4 meters away from the butandings and do not wear sunblock and other skin products (those who did were advised to wash it off at the shower area).  After that, it was less then 5 minutes trip to the feeding area.

Meeting the Butandings

Meeting the whale sharks is really a wonderful experience.  The butandings we met were all juvenile but their size is already massive (according to the boatmen, the adults come a little later in the morning).  They were accustomed to the fishermen feeding them and to the people surrounding them that they seem oblivious to humans and just swimming to and fro the boat where small shrimps are being thrown in the water.

With the boats so close together and with several people snorkeling, diving and swimming, it is impossible to stay 4 meters away from any of whale sharks.  At one point, a whale sharks just passed in front of me (the picture of the eye of the fish below) and one brushed against Elaine as she swimming.

As I said, they are really giant despite their large size that I did not fear being harmed by them but fear from drowning (even though I wear a life vest) or just dropping my camera.

I took this next two pictures while I was holding on to the boat and the whale shark was passing in front of me, so close I can touch it if I just extend my hand (of course, per briefing, it is not allowed to touch them so why break the rules?).

Solo Pictures

Being there, each of us had to take our solo pictures with the butandings…
Elaine, an applicant for an organization of skin divers, is more fearless in swimming and diving away from the boat and thus offered better opportunities to be photographed well with the giants.


Ellidel (left) and Oyet (right)

That’s me, keeping close to the boat. (left), Eman, giving the thumbs up sign for the experience. (right)

Tiny, being dunked by the boatman so she’ll be underwater (left), Macky, very near the butanding’s tail (right)

Grant, who doesn’t know how to swim (just like me) was forever anchored on the boat and hence, no picture with the butanding.

Some More Pics

Here are some more pics of the whale shark.

A whale shark swimming, with a smaller fish below it –>

A butanding waiting for the small shrimp being fed by the boatmen.


The head of the fish, up close (above), A close up of the smaller fish on the belly of the whale shark (below left), the whale shark feeding (below right)

After our 30-40 minutes of swimming with the whale sharks is up, it was time for us to go back to our hotel, tidy up and rush back to Cebu City for our flight back home.  It was such a short time but it is really wonderful and will stay with us, probably for the rest of our lives.


My Cebu Travel Companions

These are my travel companions for our Cebu trip:  Oyet, Tiny, Eman, Ellidel, Macky, Elaine and Grant.  We were on top of Osmena Peak during Osmena Day.