Traveller, Photographer, Mountaineer, Human

Hundred Islands Underwater

Our trip to Hundred Islands was motivated by our desire to go underwater.  Luckily, Hundred Islands has a place for snorkeling and with giant clams as bonus!

The “lips” of a giant clam.


Giant clams on the seafloor.

I didn’t even think I’d even see giant clams.  I once read a book about a boy whose leg was caught by a taklobo (giant clam).  That was my first “encounter” with a giant clam and that was about 15 to 20 years ago.  It was quite unreal seeing these magnificent (who are slow to close and the adult of which cannot fully close).  They are of different colors, some blue, some purple and some green.  Their lips are peppered with luminiscent spots.  Good thing that there are many (probably hundreds) of them in the national park and that they are protected by the local government.

Moorish Idol

It seems that everytime I dive now, I can see Moorish Idols (so-called because Moors of Africa once considered them good luck).  They are beautiful and graceful creatures that are very conspicuous in reefs.

Blackbelly Triggerfish

Triggerfish are notorious for being very protective of their territory.  In fact, another species of triggerfish bit my neck as I was diving down to look at some fish.  It was a black triggerfish that hides under a rock/coral and went out to bite me.  Fortunately, there was no skin break.  Also, it is not this guy.

Eastern Triangular Butterflyfish

This one, I had trouble finding the identification on the internet.  I first thought it was either an angelfish or a butterfly fish (based on its body).  After combing through several sites, I found out that butterfly fishes generally have small mouth (such as this guy) and the color palette is limited to white, black, yellow and orange.  This made it easier to narrow down the search to butterflyfishes and found the species name.

An unidentified fish, probably a goby.

This fish I still couldn’t identify.  From the body type, I assume it is a type of goby.  The thing with gobies is that it is a very large family (or some other classification) of fishes that narrowing it down is difficult.  So for now, I’ll just let this fish be unidentified.

Clownfish in its anemone home.

Clownfish!  Made very popular by Finding Nemo.  I guess almost all people know this fish as Nemo.  They are easy to spot due to their bright colors (though some are darker than the others).  Once you find their anemone home, they are quite easy to photography as they will guard it very well.  They will resort to intimidation tactics to try and scare you off.  If you do not go, they may go inside their home and just peak and then go out to try and scare you again.  Such bravado!

Other than fishes, snorkeling sites are often full of corals.  Braincorals are the easiest to identify since they look like… brains.

Brain coral.

Another coral or something.

Snorkeling and freediving for fishes is a fun activity.  Another fun thing to do is trying to identify the fish species at home.  For sure there’ll be more dives for me (just wish there is a better underwater camera for me though).

 

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