Traveller, Photographer, Mountaineer, Human

Hundred Islands

Hundred Islands is a national park located in Alaminos, Pangasinan (about 4-6 hours away from Metro Manila).  It is composed of about 127 separate islands.  Of these islands, only 3 or 4 are developed.  The other islands are either too small, have no beach or both.  There are undeveloped islands which are interesting – two of them are Monkey Island and Snake Islands, so named because of the inhabitants of these islands.  Most of the islands are made of limestone and packed with vegetation, so dense are these vegetation that even if you manage to get on one of these islands, you’ll have a hard time squeezing through them.

The following two pictures were taken from Governor’s Island , one of the developed islands.  Governor’s Island has the highest point (elevation) among the islands and these two pictures were taken from that point (using Olympus OMD EM5 and 12-50 lens).  This highest elevation isn’t really that high as it takes only 125 steps up (through a cemented stairs).  From this point, you can see most of the other islands but you’ll be hard pressed from distinguishing one from the other (other than they’re so alike, the hill is low so that in the distance, some islands looks like they’re merged).

Another developed island is Children’s Island (because the island’s beaches are shallow and ideal for kids).  We didn’t get to land in this island as we were excited to go snorkeling.

The next picture (taken with Olympus TG2) shows Crocodile Island and Turtle Island, so named because they look like these animals.  For the Crocodile Island, I can see the resemblance.  For the Turtle Island, there is also resemblance to that animal but so does tens of the other islets near the area.

There is also another island called Marcos Island (named after former president and dictator Ferdinand Marcos).  According to our boatman, this island was named that because locals then believed that this is where Marcos hid some of his treasures.  The island has a small beach and a small cave near the beach.  There is also a path going towards the middle of the island.

The following two pictures (again taken with Olympus TG2) were taken at Quezon Island, named after then president, Manuel L. Quezon.  This island is one of the biggest and the most developed of the islets.  The island has two low rocky hills connected by a short sandbar.  It is also one of the closest islands to the snorkeling area and to the giant clam sanctuary.

Quezon Island is probably the most popular among these hundred islands.  There is a group of people who maintain the islands.  There are two pavilions (with tables and chairs), some restrooms (which aren’t that clean and which use seawater, a couple of concrete cottages and a cute cottage on top of one of the rocks.  There is also a small store that sells some food and essential at high prices.  Other than our group, there were several groups camped in the island for the night but come Sunday morning, the island suddenly filled with people (who are there on daytour).  We went to the snorkeling area for a few hours and when we returned, the island was dotted with people swimming, eating, etc.

For those planning to get there, it isn’t too expensive.

  • Boat (can seat 10 people) – P2200 (P550 each)
  • Overnight fee for all the islands – P80 each
  • Tent pitch fee – P200 per tent (P100 each)
  • Bus fare from Cubao to Alaminos – P395 one way (P790 both ways each)
  • Shower (in one of the resorts in Alaminos) – P30 each
  • Tricycle from town center to the wharf – P60 for one tricycle one way
  • Food – you can bring your own food and cooking stuff

All in all, each of us probably spent less than P2000 for an overnight stay.  Not so bad considering that this is the first time we say this National Park and the giant clams.  Giant Clams!!!

 

 

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